Public transportation was in trouble before COVID-19. Can it bounce back?

We need to know what you don’t like about public transportation, and what would make you journey extra.

(Chris Samuels | The Salt Lake Tribune) A UTA bus picks up passengers in West Valley Metropolis, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2022.

This story is a part of The Salt Lake Tribune’s ongoing dedication to determine options to Utah’s greatest challenges by means of the work of the Innovation Lab.

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All aboard — or perhaps not.

It’s no shock that U.S. ridership on public transportation dropped 81% in April 2020, based on the Nationwide Transit Database (158.5 million rides taken vs. 835.1 million rides taken in April 2019).

However even earlier than COVID-19 shut down life as we knew it, individuals had been taking fewer bus and prepare rides.

A Cato Institute report states that whereas public transportation took 13% of People to work in 1960, in 2018 it carried simply 5%.

Between fiscal years 2014 to 2018, the report continues, nationwide bus ridership dropped 12.2% and rail utilization throughout the nation declined by 2.6%.

In city areas with populations of lower than 1 million and of greater than 5 million, rides on public transportation decreased by 7.2%. Areas with a inhabitants between 1-5 million noticed essentially the most important drop of 12.5%.

The Cato Institute report lists various causes for this decline, from expense and time points to the straightforward truth that just about everybody has a automobile.

The Salt Lake Tribune needs to know why readers select to not use public transportation. Whereas COVID-19 is a significant component lately, what different points preserve you off of busses and trains?

Fill out the survey beneath or go to https://bit.ly/3pbm6lA. Your responses could also be utilized in an upcoming story.

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