If Russia’s invasion of Ukraine feels familiar, look to Broadway in the 60s : NPR

Actor Zero Mostel, heart, who portrays Tevye within the musical “Fiddler on the Roof,” poses backstage with solid members after the play’s opening efficiency on the Imperial Theatre in New York on Sept. 22, 1964. Maria Karnilova, who performs Tevye’s spouse, Golde, is at far left. Taking part in Tevye’s daughters, from left, are, Tanya Everett, as Chava; Julia Migenes, as Hodel; and Joanna Merlin, as Tzeitel.

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Actor Zero Mostel, heart, who portrays Tevye within the musical “Fiddler on the Roof,” poses backstage with solid members after the play’s opening efficiency on the Imperial Theatre in New York on Sept. 22, 1964. Maria Karnilova, who performs Tevye’s spouse, Golde, is at far left. Taking part in Tevye’s daughters, from left, are, Tanya Everett, as Chava; Julia Migenes, as Hodel; and Joanna Merlin, as Tzeitel.

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“Why ought to we care about Ukraine?”

That is a query some commentators have been asking, and it is hardly new.

This is a model from a 1964 stage basic that centered on folks of that area.

“Why ought to I break my head concerning the outdoors world? Let the surface world break its personal head.”

It is a snort line, however humorous solely in its supply. Buried in a newspaper that is simply been introduced on stage, below “a narrative about crops within the Ukraine, and this and that,” is the worrisome information that in a close-by village, “all of the Jews have been evicted, pressured from their properties.”

A musical set in a city close to Sholom Aleichem’s birthplace

We’re close to the beginning right here of Fiddler on the Roof, having simply been schooled within the “Custom” that governs the city and its folks.

The musical, based mostly on “Tevye and his Daughters” by Solomon Naumovich Rabinovich — higher identified by his pen title, Sholom Aleichem — takes place within the fictional city of Anatevka, a extra singable title for a city Aleichem modeled in town of Boyarka close to his birthplace in central Ukraine. And when the musical welcomes new arrivals, they have a tendency to have traveled from the closest large metropolis, Kyiv.

Life in Anatevka is generally peaceable – the musical facilities on milkman Tevye’s makes an attempt to marry off his daughters — however there’s a lurking hazard represented by the presence of Russian troopers.

Pogroms for a century, then a revolution

In actual life, Jews within the space had been the targets of pogroms for the higher a part of a century by the 1905 depicted in Fiddler.

Not talked about within the present is that Imperial Russia was within the midst of turmoil of a broader type – a political conflagration that may later be labeled the “First Russian Revolution.” In January of 1905, Tsarist forces had opened fireplace on a peaceable employees’ demonstration in St. Petersburg, and as information of that incident unfold, so did unrest all through the empire. When greater than 170,000 employees in Ukraine went on strike, the Russian military clamped down exhausting.

Within the musical, they try this by claiming the Jewish properties in Tevye’s village for Russians and exiling all the Jews. When an officer comes to inform the folks of Anatevka they’ve three days to go away, the instinctive response of Tevye’s neighbors (“we are going to defend ourselves”) and the officer’s mocking response (“in opposition to our militia, our military? I would not advise it”) can not help resonating right now.

Nor can Tevye’s livid, if futile, closing phrases to the Russian troopers earlier than he turns into a refugee himself: “Get off my land. That is nonetheless my house, my land. Get off my land.”

A folks displaced, a historical past ravaged. Sholom Aleichem’s tales of Anatevka had been simply fifty years previous once they had been musicalized as Fiddler on the Roof, however in one other sense, they had been as as previous as time — a factor of “custom” as a result of historical past, unhappy to say, repeats itself.